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Research: Accountability

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State Accountability - State Initiatives

LBUSD operates in accordance with the Public Schools Accountability Act (PSAA) which authorizes the creation of a statewide educational accountability system for California public schools. In addition, LBUSD has implemented local level accountability measures- some district-wide and some at specific schools- in order to help schools further improve academic achievement.

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PSAA (Public Schools Accountability Act)

Public Schools Accountability Act (PSAA) authorizes the creation of an educational accountability system for California public schools. Its primary goal is to help schools improve and to measure the academic achievement of all students. PSAA has four components: Academic Performance Index (API), Award Programs based on API, Interventions based on API, and Alternative Schools Accountability Model (ASAM).

API is used to determine the annual percentage growth target for each school. Schools meeting participation and growth criteria are eligible for awards. Schools failing to meet growth targets and in the lower five API deciles are eligible for interventions.

Two kinds of award programs available based on API: Certificated Staff Performance Incentive Award, that is mainly Monetary Awards; and Governor's Performance Award (GPA) Program, which may include awards such as Monetary Awards, Superintendent's Distinguished Schools, Public commendations or schools honor roll, Waiver of Education Code requirements.

The PSAA also includes interventions based on API. Schools are placed in the Immediate Intervention/Underperforming Schools Program (II/USP) to receive improvement funding, if they fail to meet their growth targets. Schools failing to meet growth targets after one year of implementation go into Local Interventions program. Schools failing to meet growth targets after two years of implementation face State Sanctions.

Alternative Accountability System (ASAM) is offered to small schools and schools with non-traditional student populations. Schools with 11 to 99 valid test scores receive an API with an asterisk.

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API (Academic Performance Index)

The API is a single number designed to describe the academic performance of all students in a school across grade levels and content areas. This number can be used as a simple means to compare the changes in academic performance of a particular school from year to year or to compare the academic performance of similar schools for a single year or over time.

The calculation of the API is based on the distribution across percentile ranks of STAR scores earned by the students at a school. The contribution of scores to the API are weighted so that having 20% of your students in a low percentile range contributes far less to the overall API than having 20% of your students in a high percentile range. Additionally, the scores are weighted by content area to emphasize the importance of certain content areas relative to others. These three observations are illustrated in the example at this link.

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Alternative Schools Accountability Model (ASAM)

In July 2000 the SBE approved the framework for the alternative accountability system developed by the Superintendent’s Advisory Committee for the PSAA. The conceptual model for the Alternative Schools Accountability Model (ASAM) was based on that framework. The ASAM model emphasizes three central concepts:

• Student and school performance measures should be based upon multiple indicators that assess a school’s ability to serve high-risk students. The indicators should measure change in learning readiness, engagement, and educational goal attainment as well as academic achievement and cognitive growth.

• Schools should be able to choose, from a variety of indicators, those most appropriate to their goals and student populations.

• A school’s performance should be compared not with that of other schools but rather with its own performance over time.

The ASAM provides school-level supplemental accountability for more than 1,050 alternative schools serving high-risk students, the majority of which do not receive No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) determinations or valid Academic Performance Index (API) scores, primarily because of high rates of student mobility. Participation in the ASAM is voluntary. ASAM schools include community day schools, continuation schools, county community schools, county court schools, Division of Juvenile Justice (formerly California Youth Authority) schools, opportunity schools, and alternative schools of choice and charter schools that meet SBE criteria.

The ASAM uses 14 indicators of accountability. There are two categories of indicators: (1) indicators of school readiness, prelearning, and academic completion; and (2) indicators of academic achievement—specifically, preassessments and postassessments in reading, writing, and mathematics. ASAM schools and their school districts select three indicators that are then approved by the district superintendent and the governing board. Schools retain those indicators for at least three years.

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School Accountability Report Cards

The purpose of the school accountability report cards is to provide data by which parents can make meaningful comparisons between public schools enabling them to make informed decisions on which school to enroll their children.

The calculation of the API is based on the distribution across percentile ranks of STAR scores earned by the students at a school. The contribution of scores to the API are weighted so that having 20% of your students in a low percentile range contributes far less to the overall API than having 20% of your students in a high percentile range. Additionally, the scores are weighted by content area to emphasize the importance of certain content areas relative to others. These three observations are illustrated in the example at this link.

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State Content Standards

The California State Board of Education has adopted core academic content standards in four curriculum areas for kindergarten through grade 12: English-language arts, mathematics, history-social science, science, and visual and performing arts. The core content standards are the basis for the subject matter frameworks, the adoption of K-8 instructional materials, and the standards-aligned tests in California's student performance assessment system. Further information about state content standards can be found through the links to pages on the CDE site below.

The calculation of the API is based on the distribution across percentile ranks of STAR scores earned by the students at a school. The contribution of scores to the API are weighted so that having 20% of your students in a low percentile range contributes far less to the overall API than having 20% of your students in a high percentile range. Additionally, the scores are weighted by content area to emphasize the importance of certain content areas relative to others. These three observations are illustrated in the example at this link.

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CSRP (California School Recognition Program )

The California School Recognition Program was created in 1985 to communicate and reinforce the priorities of the State Board of Education and the State Superintendent of Public Instruction. Each year it identifies and honors some of the state's most exemplary and inspiring public schools. Further information about CSRP can be found through the links to pages on the CDE site below.

The calculation of the API is based on the distribution across percentile ranks of STAR scores earned by the students at a school. The contribution of scores to the API are weighted so that having 20% of your students in a low percentile range contributes far less to the overall API than having 20% of your students in a high percentile range. Additionally, the scores are weighted by content area to emphasize the importance of certain content areas relative to others. These three observations are illustrated in the example at this link.

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ED-DATA: Fiscal, Demographic, and Performance Data

The Alameda County Office of Education, the California Department of Education, EdSource, and the Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team (FCMAT) are working together to provide easy access to consistent, reliable, objective information about our public school system. The goal is to enable better informed decisions for California's schools.

The calculation of the API is based on the distribution across percentile ranks of STAR scores earned by the students at a school. The contribution of scores to the API are weighted so that having 20% of your students in a low percentile range contributes far less to the overall API than having 20% of your students in a high percentile range. Additionally, the scores are weighted by content area to emphasize the importance of certain content areas relative to others. These three observations are illustrated in the example at this link.

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